How to Market Your Webinar After It’s Finished

This post is the latest in our series on scrappy marketing – an approach can help you achieve better results in less time.

Let’s say you just ran a webinar, and it was great. Your speakers knocked it out of the park, the discussion was lively and informative, and your audience asked some inspired questions. What now? Do you just shelve the project and move on? After all that work?

The lifecycle of a webinar doesn’t have to end with its broadcast date. In this post, we’ll suggest scrappy ways of extending the life of your latest webinar by six months and beyond by making it into an on-demand webinar.

Up to 48 hours

After the stream is stopped, the panel has been thanked, and the mics are packed away, the first thing you need to do is send out a link to the recording of the webinar – not just to those who attended, but to anyone who registered who may not have shown.

Don’t worry about those streaming your webinar having a lesser experience – most interactive tools, such as chat, polls and CTAs – will still work on an on-demand webinar. Your on-demand viewers will still get answers to their questions, they just won’t be in real time.

One week

Even though the webinar is over, it’s important to keep promoting it, and social is a great way to keep the momentum going. Post links to your webinar with the call to action ‘Watch now’ along with some eye-catching imagery on Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter. It’s fine to keep it informal – that’s what we expect on social media.

Change up the message by drawing out different topics of the webinar and giving these their own social campaigns – say, SEO this week, paid search next week – so it doesn’t go stale, and that you can capture different audiences.

Six months… and beyond

Even when the webinar is well and truly in its long tail stage of popularity, you can continue to put it to work by making sure it’s always on. In fact, you can continue to promote the webinar by creating the following pieces of content that can point back to the on-demand webinar. Some ideas include:

  • Tweets: Was there an interesting poll result during the webinar? Tweet it out with a link to the webinar page.
  • Blogs: Write a blog post, perhaps a round-up of what was discussed in the webinar, or a series of blogs, each based around one of the webinar’s themes. Drop a link to the webinar in the sidebar.
  • Slides: If you have permission, post the webinar slides on SlideShare to reach a larger audience.
  • White paper: A longer piece of content, this could draw and expand on the themes raised in the webinar. Keep it relatively short.
  • Infographic: This could sum up everything that the webinar covered on a single screen. If you don’t have a design team, hire a freelancer to create this for you.
  • Put it in other webinars: Use the resources section of your webinar platform to link back to previous sessions. By doing so, you can encourage the type of ‘webinar bingeing’ that makes it easier for your audience to further their buyer journey.
  • Syndicate on other sites: To get new leads from a new audience, try syndicating your webinars on third-party sites and publishers. One bonus is that if you’re using a performance-based model for syndication, you’ll only pay for the leads that sign up.

Finally, as the original air date of the webinar draws further away, you might start to consider running it again as a simulive event, say, after about six months. This will allow you to reach a different audience and build on the insights offered by the webinar on its first airing.

To find out more about how you can make your webinars deliver results for longer, check out our guide on the Keys to Building an On-Demand Webinar Strategy.

4 Quick and Easy Webinar Formats You Can Use Right Now

This post is the latest in our series on scrappy marketing – an approach can help you achieve better results in less time.

The webinar’s primary purpose is to convey useful information to the viewer. If done well, it’s a format that can do wonders for engaging customers, but stick with the same formula and you run the risk of switching them off completely.

However, some types of webinar can take a lot of time to produce – particularly if you’re still learning the best practices. But if you’re looking to take a scrappy approach to your marketing, you want to drive results quickly. So what formats work well and require less effort than others?

Here are four webinar formats you can quickly pull together to start getting results quickly.

Run a panel discussion

What it is: A discussion among about three subject experts, moderated by the presenter.

How to do it: Find a few favorite contacts who are reliable, knowledgeable and great at communicating. They might be clients of the company or industry experts. The presenter, although moderating the discussion, should also be well-versed in discussion topics so that they can guide discussion, and think of different angles on the fly.

The discussion will be more lively and could yield more interesting insights, including offering several different approaches to a single problem, if the panelists have differing opinions. A diverse panel will make for a greater depth of discussion and have broader appeal.

Before going live, create a list of discussion topics to keep things moving and on track. Let the panel know in advance so they can prepare for the questions you’ll be asking.

For more information, read our tips for running better panel webinars.

Schedule a product demo

What it is: A look at how certain features of your product work, presented by an expert.

If your customers have a common problem that can be solved by your product, a product demo could show them how to solve that problem, while showcasing your product to a clutch of new potential customers.

How to do it: Base the webinar around a particular, concrete, problem that the solution can help users solve, rather than giving a whistlestop tour of the product, which might come off as a pitch. This approach will also help the webinar sell itself, as offer of how to solve a problem is a far more compelling proposition than a generic tour. The approach may also alert potential customers to problems they might not even know they had.

Find someone on your team who knows the product back to front, can clearly communicate complicated concepts and who won’t be thrown by unexpected questions from the audience.

ON24’s Mark Bornstein terms these sessions ‘The Deminar‘. Taking this approach allows you to have a conversation as you present, and therefore act as great bottom-of-funnel webinars.

Webinars like these have great simulive potential – that is, you can run them again and again as live ensuring that new customers also get to see them. And by putting your sales team on Q&A duty, you can have them engage in real-time even when you aren’t actually presenting. For accounting firm Sage, their daily “Coffee Break Demo” sees more than 20 sign-ups a day on average – meaning they generate as many opportunities from this automated session as all their other webinars combined.

Interview Your Boss, a Co-Worker or a Client

What it is: A chat with one of the company’s highest-ranking personnel, such as the CEO or Chief Product Officer, or with one of the company’s clients. Remember, this can be recorded in advance.

How to do it: Recruit a member of your team who is comfortable in front of the camera and may have some interviewing experience.

Draft a set of about 10 questions to put to your interviewee – you won’t need to ask all of these, in fact, you’ll probably only have time to ask more than in 45 minutes, but 10 gives you some room for maneuver. You might talk to a client about how they’ve used your product or service, or a member of your C-suite about upcoming opportunities, threats and trends in the industry. Make sure to engage the audience too, and field their questions as much as possible.

Share these with the interviewee in advance so that they can prepare, and make any suggestions – as they’re experts, they may have great ideas for discussion you may have missed. Read our article on interview webinar tips for more guidance.

Do a Content recap / revisit

What it is: A new look at an old subject which may have been rendered relevant with recent events, such as a change in legislation.

How to do it: Bring together all the material from the old webinar, including slides, audience data and ad creative. Update anything that has gone out of date.

You’ve got a headstart on promotion here – target all those who watched the webinar last time, and refresh the ad creative that worked best if you decide to take the paid social route.

Our webinar on “Bring Your Webinars Back From The Dead” provides more guidance on how to do this effectively.

Three Content Delivery Tips That’ll Make Your Customers Feel Happy

When evaluating brands, studies have shown that emotions drive buying decisions. So, every marketing strategy should aim to invoke emotion on a personal level. It’s a difficult task, but marketers need to focus on how their target audiences feel.

Here are three ways ON24 can help give your target audience that special feeling.

Engagement Should Be Personal

What does your audience want? Prospects and customers want to feel special and not just “one of many.” They crave content, but they only want content that pertains to them and helps them in their journey.

A recent Gartner survey found companies risk losing 38 percent of customers with poor personalization. The problem: while personalization is important, it’s also difficult. That’s why ON24 Webcast Elite and  ON24 Target makes building personalized content experiences based on accounts, personas or industry, easy.

With robust content insights on viewing time, comments and more, ON24 allows you to track content performance to ensure you choose the right content for each target audience. Coupled with high-touch, customizable CTAs, you can provide personalized content journeys and engagement points with your brand.

Mix Up the Content Delivery

Content is more than static words or images. To bring your stat static content to life by mixing up the  experience’s delivery! Webcast Elite enables you to dynamically engage with audiences through live or recorded video streaming and tools like Q&A and group chat.

Providing various types of multimedia assets keeps your audience engaged with your brand for longer. ON24 Engagement Hub provides an always-on resource that delivers content how your audience wants it (à la Netflix binging), it also doesn’t limit you to one type of content.

Having a mix of webinars, videos and case studies available in your Hub lets prospects better engage with your content. By putting your best content all in one location, you create your own mini-Netflix experience, putting audience members in control.

Listen

It’s that simple. People want to be heard. However you’re communicating with your audience, you need to create a connection. ON24 products offer interactivity tools—such as polls, surveys, an ideation tool to encourage group engagement and ratings and comments — all to engage with your audience in unique ways. Give your audience the opportunity to be more engaged and create more of a conversation.

Remembering “the feels” will help improve your interaction with prospects and customers, no matter the communication method you use. See how ON24 helps you create engagement that matters.

Insight50 On: Simplifying International Marketing

Our upcoming Insight50 session will explore how to simplify international marketing. Sign up for the session and have your questions answered.

Your domestic campaign is flawless — it’s engaging, measurable and drives results. It’s time to broaden its reach and expand into foreign markets. But can your campaign translate and produce the same results? Marketers today don’t see success in foreign markets by simply implementing a “cut and paste” strategy.

The “clone and go” mindset isn’t living up to expectations. Pipeline is low in APAC, cultural references are missed in France and the German team just won’t buy in.

It’s time to figure out what’s going on. Tune into this month’s Insight50, taking place this tomorrow, April 25 at 3:00 p.m. BST | 4:00 p.m. CEST (10:00 a.m. EDT) as our panel of marketers discuss what’s worked for them when it comes to global campaigns and what to avoid.

Our panel includes:

  • Michael Meinhardt: CEO at Cloudwords
  • Peter Bell: Marketing Director at Marketo
  • Paula Morris: Founder at Pi Marketing

Join us for insight into:

  • The key steps to successful local translations
  • How to segment and target your database
  • How to test and adapt campaigns for new markets
  • Best practices for benchmarking regional performance
  • Tips for aligning with local teams

Register your place today and unite your international team!

Curious about how ON24 tackles its international efforts? The ON24 team shares how they make it work:

The Ultimate Content Marketing Brainstorming Session Checklist

This post is the latest in our series on scrappy marketing – an approach can help you achieve better results in less time.

Previously on the ON24 blog we’ve explored ideas on the theme of scrappy marketing, specifically:

So what should you do next after reading this all? If you’re lucky, this information might have provided the ‘lightbulb moment’ that has allowed you to identify the content and the steps needed for your next campaign – if so, great! You should get started and not waste any more time than is necessary.

That being said, you might feel you need more structure to bring these ideas together into a tangible plan of action. If so, running a brainstorming session that has a clear objective at the end of it can help you get to that position.

That being said, make sure you prioritize speed over rigidly following a process. The faster you can pull a campaign together, the quicker you will see results and be able to iterate accordingly.

How can brainstorming help with scrappy marketing?

On its own, a brainstorming session can offer the following benefits:

  • It can help bring your team together and energize them for further action. As such, you’ll be able to inspire your co-workers to drive results quickly.
  • If you need more ideas, brainstorming allows for divergent thinking – taking the information you have and thinking of the possible ways you can generate results.
  • For those who want a concrete plan, brainstorming can also assist with convergent thinking – taking all the threads you have and choosing a plan of action. It’s this final step of convergent thinking that will help turn a laundry list of ideas into a concrete series of next steps.

Our checklist below aims to cover all of these.

The Six-Step Checklist for a Content Marketing Brainstorm Session

We’ve broken up how you can run a brainstorming session that will provide you with a plan of action, based loosely on David Allen’s Natural Planning Model from the book Getting Things Done.

While the below is focused on running a session with a team, there’s no reason why you can’t adapt the steps as an individual.

1. Prepare the session

Preparing your brainstorming session in advance will help you to make sure it is a success. Follow the below steps to get things off on the right foot.

  • Choose a time and a place to bring people together. Setting a time in the calendar will help ensure that the right people come together. Make sure any place has enough space and ideally has a whiteboard (or at least a flipchart where the pieces of paper can be torn off and put on the wall).
  • Make sure your session is time-limited. Too many internal meetings and creative sessions can stretch beyond a useful period of time. By limiting the amount of time you spend – perhaps to no more than an hour – will place an emphasis on keeping energy levels high and getting to a plan of action, both of which are characteristics of a plan of action.
  • Share an agenda with a clear outcome. Sharing an agenda in advance will help to set structure for the session and make sure people come prepared. Your clear outcome should be to leave with a plan and the next actions that you can put in play.
  • Set the ground rule for deciding on the chosen plan. In a group activity, there is a chance that you won’t gain consensus on the right approach. To avoid this, set a ground rule for how you’ll decide. A suggestion included in this checklist is to have the group add a tally mark to any ideas but on the board.
  • Assemble your information and bring equipment for the session. Tell people to bring any insights that you may have gathered previously, whether from external sources or from your own customer insight. If you’re going to use a whiteboard (as suggested below), bring pens, Post-Its and any other material that will help to get ideas together.

2. Start the session by agreeing on a goal that your plan should achieve.

  • Restate the outcome. So everyone is clear, make sure you emphasize that the aim of the session is to come out with a plan.
  • List out your marketing priorities. While your objective for the session will be to come out with a plan of action, ultimately that’s not an end in itself. What’s the aim of your plan? Listing out your priorities will help you choose. They may include a number of marketing-qualified leads you have to generate, the number of opportunities for sales, or a number of conversations opened with target accounts.
  • Choose a SMART goal that meets at least one of those priorities. Setting a specific, measurable, and actionable goal to achieve by a particular time will help focus your ideas accordingly. Remember, part of a scrappy mentality is to deliver outsized results. As such, make sure not to limit yourself – but also, make sure that your goal can be quick enough to achieve that you will be able to get results sooner rather than later.

3. Set a loose structure for your plan

  • Differentiate between themes and tactics. Marketing campaigns can be looked at from two different angles – a creative or messaging angle (themes) and the approaches you’ll take to get there (tactics). Your brainstorm will produce both, but it’s important to distinguish between the two. To help with this, you might find it helpful to divide your whiteboard initially into these two blocks.
  • Identify what stages your campaign needs. Any quality marketing campaign doesn’t consist of just one touch. At its most basic level, you need to think of how you’ll acquire prospects, how they will engage, and what happens after that (often a conversion of some kind, but there may be a number of steps involved – particularly if you are looking to nurture prospects over a period of time). A very simple method might be to take one particular campaign and split it into three sections: beginning, middle and end. For a webinar, this will likely consist of how you’ll drive registrations, how you’ll engage them as they watch, and what the follow-up activity will be.
  • Draw out on a whiteboard (or a very large piece of paper) a column for each of these stages. If you’re in a meeting room with a whiteboard, break up the ‘tactics’ section into these sections. During the actual brainstorm part, you can then have your team add their ideas on Post-Its which you can then put into each part.

4. Start brainstorming for ideas

After you’ve run through the above steps, your whiteboard might look something like the below:

The next part is to start creating ideas that can fill this out into a plan of action. This part is the divergent element of the session.

  • Collate any information you’ve already been able to gather. Make sure all those ideas and data points that you’ve been able to gather prior to the session are laid out for people to see.
  • Get your team to write down as many theme ideas as they can. Set a timer, and let them loose on the kinds of messages and angles that might resonate with your target audience to reach your goal.
  • Get your team to write down any tactical ideas as they can. Set another timer, and get them to write down the tactics you might employ in line with any themes.
    Put these all on the whiteboard. So everyone can see the ideas, make sure they are visible for those looking.

5. Explain, assess and order the ideas

This part of the session is the convergent aspect – where ideas come together in an order that will help you take action.

  • Ask each person in turn to explain the ideas they’ve put on the whiteboard. A small Post-It might not describe the full context of what they’ve written down.
  • Choose which ones to move forward with. If you want your team to vote, an easy approach is to ask them to put a tally mark on their favorite ideas. Those with the most tally marks will be the ones you move forward with.
  • Confirm the plan. If you’ve taken the voting method, you’ll now have an idea of the themes you’ll cover and the tactics to be used. Congratulations! This is the foundation of your plan. Say this out loud so everyone is clear on the approach.
  • Save the other ideas. You will have spent a great deal of creative effort on getting these ideas together, so don’t waste them! Take a photograph or save the Post-Its to help with the next campaign going forward.

6. List the next actions

It’s now time to put the plan into action without delay.

  • Write down at least five next steps you’ll take to put this into play. You may be in a position to plan out all the actions required to bring your plan to fruition, but if not, make sure you list out at least five next steps you’ll need to take.
  • Assign these next steps to members of the team with a date for completion. Make sure each of the next steps has an owner and a deadline for completion.
  • Set a check-in date. While this doesn’t need to be a full meeting, you’ll want to ensure that any plan doesn’t get taken over by the other day-to-day demands placed on your team.
  • Optional – set a retrospective date. So you can learn moving forward, it can be helpful to review your plan to find out whether you achieved your goal, what worked well and what can be improved.

Final Takeaways

  • Be pragmatic. Run with what works. The above steps aren’t all mandatory – and following them rigidly can eat into the sense of agility that you should look to encourage in a team.
  • Make it fun! All too often, group sessions can leave people with lower energy than they started with. As such, make sure to frame it as a fun exercise. You may find it helpful asking someone with facilitation skills to help bring it together.
  • Keep in mind ‘always on’ marketing. Make sure you’re not creating one-hit wonders. From any plan you develop, you’ll want to use it as the foundation for continuous improvement. While this learning can help you re-run the plan, considering ‘always on’ approaches can help you create systems that continue to pay dividends long after they’ve been created.

5 Scrappy Ways To Accelerate Your Marketing

Earlier on the ON24 blog, we introduced the theme of scrappy marketing and why it can help you achieve more. This next post provides ideas on how you can put that into practice.

As marketers, we’re pushed for time to achieve our goals – and we rarely have the budget or resource we would love to have. But with a scrappy mindset, we don’t let that limit our ambitions. Instead, we embrace the challenge and look for creative ways to drive gain results quickly.

So how can you make moves to accelerate your marketing, find out what works and what doesn’t, and ultimately smash your targets?

Below are five tactics to consider when you’re looking to drive results more quickly.

Run Micro-campaigns: A Low-Risk Way of Testing Ideas

If you’re only just starting to dip your toe into scrappy waters, and are feeling a little apprehensive, running micro-campaigns is a great place to start.

These are small, low-cost and highly-targeted efforts to test an idea or a target market. Because of the little investment micro-campaigns need to get off the ground – they can take just days or hours to pull together – you can afford to take some risks with them, experiment with different angles, and discover what kinds of ideas and themes resonate with your audience.

Some types of micro-campaign could include:

  • Running display ads with experimental creative, perhaps limited to a particular type of day. For example, if you’re selling technology for B2B lead generation, you could run a campaign with the slogan “Hungry for leads?” around lunchtime.
  • Promoting a webinar format aimed at just one account. If this works, you could repurpose it as part of your account-based marketing efforts.
  • Testing paid search terms for verticals that use cases you haven’t focused on in the past. Providing you get enough volume, you may discover a market that you haven’t previously targeted.

Micro-campaigns can also encourage your team to be more creative. By giving them permission to think beyond existing campaigns and messaging, but limiting the time and budget they can spend on such efforts, you empower them to find new ways of improving performance.

Curate and Syndicate Existing Content

There’s really no need to reinvent the wheel. By curating consistently useful, comprehensive and relevant content, sourced from different places online, you can establish yourself as a reliable source of information.

Even major enterprise businesses are built on the back of curating useful data. As an example, research firm eMarketer collects data points from studies by other companies and distills it down to the most important takeaways.

Syndicating content can also help in terms of both building your content on-site and reaching audiences elsewhere. Many excellent posts on the ON24 blog have originally been published elsewhere (and are marked as such). In addition, ON24’s webinars and resources are promoted on third-party sites.

To save time reaching out to individual publishers and media sites, syndication networks such as NetLine can help you get your content hosted elsewhere, driving leads automatically.

Apply the Create Once, Publish Everywhere (COPE) Principle

If you’ve invested a great deal of time (and sweat) into creating a resource from scratch, it only seems right that the resource works hard too. Think about different types of content you could launch off the back of the resource that you can post on different platforms and reach different audiences with.

In a blog post on Search Engine Land, Ted Ives shows how a single whitepaper can be repurposed into 19 different content assets – including blog posts, a webinar, a podcast, or even an email newsletter.

Transcription can also be particularly powerful, especially given the range of low-cost tools and solutions now on the market. If you assume a speaking rate of just one word a second, an hour-long webinar could produce 3,600 words of content that can all be repurposed elsewhere.

Automate routine processes

In scrappy marketing, speed is key, so it makes sense to automate as many of the simple, routine processes marketing as possible.

Tools like Zapier let you schedule the publication of content on blogging platforms or social by getting apps to talk to each other, while marketing automation platforms like Marketo can keep interested customers engaged by sending them more of your relevant content at a pace that suits them.

Some types of automation you could consider include:

  • Automated social posts when you publish a new blog post on your site.
  • Triggered emails based on a particular on-site action, such as visiting a particular page on your site.
  • Automatically adding content to a newsletter by using dynamic email templates.
  • Running automated product demos, where your sales team can answer questions from any attendees.

While you should take care to make sure any automation doesn’t appear spammy or low-quality, this can also act as a creative exercise for your team in terms of figuring out ways to drive results automatically.

Establish Checklists, Templates and Reusable Formats

In other words: don’t think more than you need to. Trying to remember the same steps of a process each time you do it, or creating similar pieces of content over and over… this takes a lot of cognitive energy that could be saved by falling back on established content formats, templates and checklists.

Marketing publisher Econsultancy built much of its audience using a list of 34 different blog post formats. As a result, even on a slow day, the editorial team can quickly go to this list as a source of inspiration, allowing them to turn content around quickly and with less effort.

Checklists can also help you get things done more quickly, reduce the chance of failure and aid team coherence, just what your organization needs to succeed in its scrappy endeavors. ON24 even uses its own Webinar Checklist to plan its sessions and make sure they are a success.

How to Understand Your Customer’s Digital Body Language

This post was originally published on which-50.com.

Digital trends are changing the way organisations market and sell. When potential customers are more likely to begin their research online, tools such as webinars offer an engaging and cost-effective way to educate people about a product or service.

They are also a great way to identify where customers are in their buying cycle and provide tailored support specific to each customer. The key, says Daniel Harrison, General Manager Customer Experience, Oracle Digital, is in bringing together marketing and sales to decipher the digital body language.

“Understanding what a prospect did at a webinar is very important to share actionable insights to your sales team,” Harrison says.

This is where what is often seen as the flaw of webinars transforms into a strength. It is not uncommon for some 40–60 per cent of registrants to not attend. Others may leave a few minutes in. The strength lies not only in the highly engaged audience who stay for the duration, but in how sales team engage with registrants after the event. Different ‘digital body language’ cues require different responses and levels of follow-up.

“A prospect who dropped off up early might respond well to an email proposing a different set of more appealing topics, while a highly engaged prospect who asked several questions shows high purchase intent — so a sales rep should follow-up quickly,” Harrison says.

In the non-digital world, the ‘one-size-fits-all’ process of gathering these insights is highly manual, open to misinterpretation and often not based on the needs of the customer. Oracle Digital has transformed this approach by developing an engagement methodology around the webinar and automating it to drive a personalised experience.

“By analysing digital body language from webinars, we aim to drive internal efficiency in making sure our sales reps are guided accordingly on the hot opportunities. By running webinars that nurture our audiences in a programmatic manner, we also looking to shorten sales cycles and improve win rates.”

For Harrison and his team, it is all about putting customers at the steering wheel.

“We see customers as the real innovators in the Experience Economy,” he says. “They force organisations to disrupt and rethink their product roadmap and go-to-market strategy.

With that in mind, Oracle Digital analyses clickstream data to shortlist webinar topics and uses the ON24 platform to ensure the audience is anything but a mere spectator.

“They can ask questions, and use live polls and surveys to provide real-time feedback. It’s particularly important for us to get the digital pulse of our customers so we can proactively connect with them at the right time in their buying cycle.”

The result is the alignment of sales and marketing that marries the quality outcomes of the former with the reach of the latter, creating a feedback loop that is better for everybody — especially the customer.

Daniel Harrison is presenting at Webinar World in Sydney on Thursday 2 May.

What Are the Challenges of International Marketing?

Our upcoming Insight50 session will be exploring how marketers can simplify their international marketing. Sign up for the session to get your questions answered, with expert speakers including Michael Meinhardt, CEO and Founder at Cloudwords, Peter Bell, Marketing Director at Marketo, and Paula Morris, Senior Director and Founder at Pi Marketing.

Digital technology opens up a literal world of opportunity when it comes to B2B marketing. Teams no longer need to stick to targeting companies that are based close enough for a face-to-face meeting, as both identifying and connecting with prospects can be done from anywhere with an internet connection.

But scaling efforts to reach a global market isn’t as straightforward as it might sound, as there are a whole host of potential challenges that can get in the way.

Ahead of the webinar, we’ve put together a few thoughts to consider before you run your campaigns internationally.

Engagement differs across markets

An obvious challenge when marketing internationally is language. Your target audience may not speak the same language as you so translations need to be consistent and accurate and your content needs to resonate.

But it’s more than language. There will be local challenges for each target audience that are different and could present a challenge. You will want to be conscientious about cultural factors may exist and, depending on the area you are dealing with, the regulatory and competitive landscape may vary. Another thing to keep in mind is campaign performance can also vary significantly.

Aligning efforts need effective coordination

Even in a single market, it can be easy to step on a colleague’s toes when it comes to running campaigns. It can be even more complicated when you’re dealing with global and regional teams that may not interact regularly and may have some crossover of accounts.

Communication is really the key here. To avoid crossing streams and getting in each others’ way, it’s important for the different teams to establish clear ownership of accounts and establish targeting rules. Through effective and ongoing communication, regional and global marketing teams can actually help instead of hinder each other.

Small teams can struggle to be heard and win resources

Depending on your organization’s structure, local teams may find it hard to get the resources and buy-in they need if they require approval from head office. Other factors such as language and vastly different time zones can exacerbate the problem making smaller teams feel stranded out there on their own.

Technology can help

The good news is that technology can assist with all these challenges and others.

Language barriers can be overcome with translation technology, which has improved considerably in recent years. A centralised and well-maintained marketing technology stack (including CRM and marketing automation) can avoid different teams getting in each others’ way or approaching the same targets. In addition, collaboration software such as Slack can narrow the gap between teams within the organisation as well as bring smaller groups into the loop with the head office.

Furthermore, technology can also help simplify your efforts, which can help you reach more markets even when resources are limited.

So while there may be challenges to marketing internationally, these will always be outweighed by the opportunities.

To find out more and ask your questions, make sure to sign up to our Insight50 webinar on Simplifying International Marketing.

Why Webinar Marketing Requires Great Planning

Interested in learning the latest webinar tips, tricks and innovations? Discover how APAC gets digital marketing done on May 2 at Webinar World Sydney. Click here to learn more.

This post was originally published on which-50.com.  

Webinars are an extremely powerful marketing tool, according to Alison Jack, Marketing Campaign Coordinator at Employsure. She warns that they take time and effort to organise — but the rewards are worth it.

She says, “Planning is key. A lack of planning and structure can lead to ad hoc webinars thrown together at the last minute. A proper strategy maps out exactly how your webinars will contribute to your overall marketing activity.

She also believes there has to be engaging content. “Before we had a strategy in place, it was common to reuse presentations from live seminars to try to replicate the same success.

“However, keep in mind an online audience often has a shorter attention span and can easily be distracted. Webinar content therefore needs to be highly engaging with a range of video content, clean slides, polls, and a Q&A to keep the audience engaged and switched on.”

Creating Consistent Branded User Experience

Jack says that when various teams are creating webinars, it can be hard to keep a consistent standard approach.

“For example, our teams were using different types of landing pages and registration forms that weren’t consistent.

“To resolve this, we created new landing page templates, EDM templates, PPT templates and webinar background for the teams to use.”

To streamline some of their processes, they updated their CRM with the ON24 attendee list, so it is updated every four to 24 hours.

Before they were manually updating the CRM with the list. There was also two- to three-day waiting period before receiving the attendee list.

She says, “We also can sort the leads by engagement score, so we know the sales team are reaching out to the hottest leads first. Giving the sales team access to the questions asked during the Q&A had a huge impact on the quality of the conversation with the leads.

“Pre-recording the webinar and creating a Simu live or On-demand event has been a huge time saver. The production schedule is carefully planned, and we do not have worry about nervous presenters or technical issues.”

Improving Knowledge Of Webinars

Improving the sales team’s knowledge of webinars is important, as Jack argues webinar leads require a different approach to inbound leads or leads that attend physical events.

She says Employsure conducted an internal analysis of its webinar follow-up strategy and discovered the first 24 to 48 hours after the webinar is a crucial time to begin to nurture attendees and move them down the sales funnel.

“This timeframe is your chance to continue the dialogue with your audience, including reaching out to the no-shows, which we also discovered converted better between 48 to 72 hours following the webinar.

“We worked with key stakeholders in the sales department to set up a dedicated team of sales people to target these webinar leads. To arm the dedicated sales team, we also created a best practice guide with useful info on the types of questions the sales team should ask on the call,” she says.

Hard Work Pays Off

Earlier this year Employsure conducted a webinar series called Back to Basics — a three-part series helping small business owners start the new year right.

Jack says this webinar series was a huge success, with more than 520 registrations, 228 attendees, 68 sales meetings booked, and sales of $236,828 from three webinars.

She says, “For marketers, this is where all your hard work in planning and hosting a webinar pays off. You now have a wealth of data and can strategically package it for a smooth handoff to your sales team.

“The success was the result of an effective strategy, engaging content and a confident team of sales people that knew exactly how to approach these leads.”