The Lean Webinar: Three Steps To Improving Your Webinars Over Time

This post is the final post in our series on scrappy marketing – an approach can help you achieve better results in less time.

One of the most talked about business books in recent times has been The Lean Startup by Eric Ries. The book looks to address a key problem for young companies and new initiatives – that too much time is spent on ideas and products before they get feedback from customers:

Too many startups begin with an idea for a product that they think people want. They then spend months, sometimes years, perfecting that product without ever showing the product, even in a very rudimentary form, to the prospective customer. When they fail to reach broad uptake from customers, it is often because they never spoke to prospective customers and determined whether or not the product was interesting.

The same could be said for marketing. Too often in the past, teams have spent hours or days arguing over the copy, finessing messages and creative, cycling through a process of revisions and feedback that makes campaigns take too long to get to market.

But today, change happens too quickly. Instead, marketers should be taking an iterative approach, putting more value on getting results and feedback over making things ‘perfect.’

This is one of the key benefits of scrappy marketing. By getting more done in less time, you’ll get more data on what works and what doesn’t. This can then be fed back into future campaigns and activity. Over time, each cycle of your marketing activity will become better.

So, as you go forward with your scrappy marketing journey, we’d like to make the case for The Lean Webinar. It’s what many ON24 customers have been doing instinctively over time and feeds into how they progress through four stages – from webi-newbie, to webi-basic, to webi-pro and webinerd.

Summing up our earlier posts from the scrappy marketing series, here are the three steps you should follow to progress your journey.

1. Build Your Webinars Fast

Earlier we covered how you can get quick campaign ideas, accelerate your marketing and webinar formats that are quick and easy.

You should put these steps together to make sure you can get webinars out to your audience at pace. If you’re still struggling for time, see if there are any old webinars you can repurpose. Delegate more to your team and give them the freedom to experiment.

To get attendees, revisit tactics to drive webinar registrations at speed, and make sure to use third-party sites and syndication partners.

2. Measure Your Results

Once you’ve run your webinars, look at their performance to find out how you performed against your goals. Our checklist for content marketing brainstorming has guidance here, along with our post on how to measure webinar success.

The good thing about running webinars is that they will collect a range of metrics that you can use to assess your performance.

3. Learn and Apply

Once you have your results, review the figures and ask where there may be opportunities to drive further performance. This should become a regular marketing habit.

Taking a scrappy approach means that you don’t have to look to overhaul your entire campaign if it’s performing in certain areas. Instead, look for quick tweaks where you can improve performance.

Some ideas you might want to explore include tips to improve webinar engagement, turning your webinar into a podcast, or driving always-on webinar viewing. You can also look to make your webinars better by building an improvised webinar studio.

In isolation, each of these changes might not initially add up to much. But put together, these incremental steps will help build results over time.

Good luck with your journey to becoming a scrappy webinerd!

How Can We Humanise the Digital Marketing Experience?

Each month, the team at ON24 puts together Insight50 – where we provide fellow Webinerds with 50 minutes of expert insight and answer the questions that are important to you.

One of our recent sessions was on humanising the digital marketing experience. With just about every marketer singing the praises of the benefits of personalisation, how can it be done at scale without losing the personal touch and putting off prospects?

The below is just a brief wrap up of insights from Joel Harrison at B2B Marketing, Leanne Chesco at Demandbase and Matt Heinz at Heinz Marketing – and of course, you the viewers! If you didn’t manage to see it, view it on-demand here.

As we move further into the world of digital, keeping marketing personal and human can prove to be difficult. While it is one thing to be able to personalise the experience for one or even a few targets, it’s another to do it at scale.

So how do marketers use the technology available to them to work at scale, keep it personal and make it human? Here are a few insights from our panel of experts.

Why is it important to be human at scale?

You could probably look in your inbox right now and find an email that was meant to be personalised, but somehow failed for any number of reasons. In fact, more than 4 in 10 (43.3%) of webinar attendees reported that on a weekly basis, they received ‘personal’ emails that were clearly automated and as a result became irritated. Another one-third (33.3%) said they receive these types of emails daily.

It’s clear that receiving emails where it is apparent that no one bothered to research who the recipient is, what their organisation does or the specific needs of the organisation are can be off-putting to the recipient and counterproductive for the sender.

For Joel, the importance of being human at scale is because as marketing continues to become more digital, it becomes more difficult to get more traction in brands and to see through what is not relevant.

“As much as we need to be digital, we need to be human. That’s what creates traction with our audience. I think it’s fair to say that B2B buyers are becoming more and more cynical so I think that, for me, that’s the importance of being human.”

At the same time, Matt Heinz warned about getting too caught up on efficiency and scale at the expense of the experience for the buyer. He reminds the audience of the importance of creating a one-on-one experience for their customers.

“I think it’s important to keep in mind that no matter what your campaign is, no matter where you’re sending it from, for the recipient, for the buyer, for your customer, it is always a one-on-one interaction. They don’t care how many other people you’re sending that message to. They are just thinking about themselves. And they’re receiving that message as one person as an individual.”

How can automation be used more effectively?

When webinar attendees were asked to describe their organisation’s approach when it comes to automation 39.3% said they did not use marketing automation and 28.6% said they use automation in a limited way.

One-fifth (21.4%) said they do use automation more than before, but it still sometimes appears stilted and unnatural. For these organisations who reported using automation but maybe not in the most effective way, Matt suggested stepping back away from working in ‘fire drill mode’ and looking at what automation can do for the organisation.

“What you’re doing in eight hours, you could do in two. What you’re doing to impact 100 customers, you could impact 10,000 customers. And yes, you’re going to have to step back and do some work to put that in place. But that investment and creating those automated systems is going to have a far-reaching, scalable, highly valuable impact on what marketing can do not only with those customers, but the impact marketing can have on sales and revenue.”

For organisations that have marketing automation in place but their sales teams are not taking advantage of it, Leanne suggests that marketers get that data into the hands of reps. Providing them information like intent data can help validate that their prospects are showing buying signals, while behavioural data from target accounts can inform salespeople that their prospects are visiting their website.

“Say a customer is coming up for renewal, you can look at things like intent data to understand actually what that company is looking at. That includes content that’s on your website, but also content that could be on your competitor’s website. That’s definitely the type of data that is great to get in the hands of your salespeople to help them validate that this account is in a good position to either engage in a sales cycle, or that the sales cycle looks healthy.”

What are the barriers to making the digital marketing experience more human?

One of the barriers to humanising the digital experience for one-quarter (25%) of the webinar attendees was a lack of time and personnel to develop processes and campaigns. Other barriers to a lesser degree included legacy technology, integration between systems and internal disagreements about the best approach to take.

However, the biggest barrier for one-third (33.3%) of attendees was a lack of quality data. Leanne recommended that organisations make sure they are targeting the right accounts and that they have a good contact acquisition strategy in place so they know they are targeting the right stakeholders.

“If you’re leveraging those different technologies or tools out there to show you that those accounts are active and showing you active buying signals, I think that’s definitely going to help with engagement and improve your quality of data.”

Hear more on our Insight50 session

The quotes above are just a small sample of what was discussed and answered on this Insight50 session. Make sure to register to watch on-demand and strengthen your topical marketing campaigns for the year ahead.

How To Make Scrappy Marketing a Habit for Success

This post is the latest in our series on scrappy marketing – an approach can help you achieve better results in less time.

Over the past few weeks, we’ve covered a number of posts on how to put scrappy marketing into place – from brainstorming for ideas through to promoting your webinar after it’s finished.

However, like all good habits, the long-term benefits only come from a consistent approach. So how can you make sure your efforts stick and last over time?

Here are a few ideas you can put into practice to keep results high.

Make Every Webinar Always-On

There are a lot of ways to get the most of your after it’s gone live.

While old webinars can be passed off as brand new, before even doing this you can simply make sure that each webinar you produce is available to access as an always-on session.

The latest stats from ON24’s Webinar Benchmarks Report show that more than one-third (36 percent) of attendees only watch always-on sessions, with the majority of this group signing up a week after the webinar ends.

With many people working either non-standard hours or across time zones, the timing of a live webinar will never work for absolutely everyone. By making sure that each webinar is available as an always-on session, you can encourage both viewers to binge-watch your webinars and provide a place to experiment with scrappy approaches to driving always-on sign-ups.

Build in Reminders and Routines

Previously we covered how you can make your marketing team more agile, getting them to buy into the scrappy mindset. Following those steps will help remove barriers to productivity, get them to experiment and work at speed.

However, keeping this up requires habits and processes. Productivity guru James Clear mentions that habits (whether good or bad) typically follow the same process – a cue triggers a desire to take action, which leads to a response and a reward.

As such, you should look at what cues and reminders you can set up as triggers for routines. As an example:

  • On a certain day of the week, you publish content covering a particular theme.
  • When a blog article is published, your team members promote it on social media.
  • When a webinar is scheduled, your sales team gets notified so they can send it to prospects.

The reward in each case should be tied to your goals – but you may also wish to incentivize your team to drive further success.

Take Advantage of Reusable, Repeatable Formats

There will inevitably be days when members of your team aren’t feeling as productive as they would like or have a lot of other priorities depleting their mental energy.

Trying to reinvent the wheel each time will simply lead to reduced performance. Instead, you should look at what reusable and repeatable formats you can run that follow a given formula. The formula should be structured enough that it requires minimal effort to put things into place.

Furthermore, if you schedule these reusable formats, it makes planning your demand generation and marketing activity (and predicting results) far easier, leaving you with more time to experiment on different approaches.

While running webinars initially may take more time than other marketing approaches such as sending out an email newsletter or posting something on social media, there are also webinar formats that are quick to run – such as panel sessions, demos and interviews.

But an important point – make sure to experiment within these regular formats. Always be looking for interesting ways to liven them up or novel approaches to generate better results.

Make Scrappy Marketing Part of Your Identity

Once you are doing scrappy marketing regularly, it should become part of the way you generate results for your business. But there’s always the risk that outside pressures might make you revert to old ways.

As marketing is always evolving, failing to experiment and try things out – particularly with limited resources – will eventually make you less effective.

Being proud to be a scrappy marketer will help you maintain that curious and energetic edge that will give you a lead over others. When things inevitably change, your scrappy mindset will help you make the most of the situation, reaping rewards when others fail.

6 Elements of Modern Content Marketing

B2B content marketing is having a rough go of it lately. Optimism is low even though content marketers are creating, sharing and promoting more content than ever before. The content created gets lost in the digital noise, the data collected isn’t thorough and the audiences reached aren’t receptive.

We know why and how B2B content marketers are failing. But how are they succeeding?  According to a joint study between ON24 and Heinz Marketing,  the marketers that get the most out of their content know how to drive engagement. What’s more, the successful marketers in the study all share certain traits.

More Content Marketing Tips

To provide you with a better idea of what’s working, we’ve consolidated the traits found in successful content programs into six attributes. These high-level qualities cannot be easily shoehorned into a content program, but marketers should use these attributes as guideposts as they move towards a content program based on engagement, rather than clicks.

Attribute One: Personalization

Successful content marketing programs customizer messaging for individual audiences. To do so, content creators must have a keen understanding of audience pain points, industry terminology and a robust library of personas to draw on — even at the expense of campaign efficiency.

Attribute Two: Interaction

Audiences need to interact with content, not stare at it. This means taking advantage of two-way conversations through digital media and in-person events. Driving a two-way conversation can help an audience understand what they need from a solution and help marketers better target and engage with audiences.

Attribute Three: Curiosity

Great content programs evoke curiosity in audiences. News updates, product releases, in-depth installation guides, expert commentary and more can all pique the interest of relevant attendees. Again, having a well-defined understanding of a target audience is necessary to know what makes them curious and what makes them click away.

Attribute Four: Personas

This entry should be no surprise given how much of content marketing depends on well-honed personas. With quality personas, marketers can bring out the personality in content and craft work that’ll actually get read, rather than glanced at.

Attribute Five: Precision

Up to 90 percent of content marketers create for sales goes unused. The solution isn’t, however, to create less. Instead, marketers need to make their content more precise. Assets should address the unique pain points their prospective customers face in the buying journey — even if it’s a single slide or quote.

Attribute Six: Brevity

Brevity is the soul of both wit and good marketing. Knowing when to say less — or provide less — can help marketers engage more. So, take a step away from the 20-page white paper and send a summary to your audience instead.

Why B2B Marketers Need to Drive Webinar Engagement

B2B marketers are faced with a crowded, attention-sucking environment. There’s a lot of digital noise out there, so it’s important to make the most out of opportunities proven to drive engagement. As it turns out, webinars are a great opportunity. According to Demand Gen Report’s annual Content Preferences Survey, 64 percent, or two-thirds of respondents say they’re willing to spend 20 to 60 minutes in a webinar.

But simply running webinars isn’t going to be enough. For B2B marketers to get the most out of webinars, they need to build events with engagement in mind — from polls and surveys to panels and pre-event questions. In fact, Demand Gen Report hit this point home in a recent article, “B2B Marketers Look To Modernize Webinar Experiences By Promoting Two-Way Engagement.

Click the links below to learn how webinars engage:

Making Way for Two-Way Dialogue in Webinars

Demand Gen Report’s Brian Anderson sat down to chat with several webinar experts to discuss how B2B marketers can craft webinars with engagement in mind and collected several great tips. Among those tips is providing opportunities to drive two-way dialogue in webinars.

When folks talk about two-way dialogue in webinars a few common tactics come up. Q&A sessions, polls, surveys and chat rooms are all common tools that can easily be deployed.

Combine these tools with varying webinar formats — such as expert panels, product demos and video briefs — and you have a great recipe for two-way conversations with attendees. Presenters can watch a webinar’s chat feed and respond to questions in real-time. Polls can give them a better understanding of where audiences are at and tailor the program to suit the audience.

Prepping Webinar Engagement

But two-way dialogue extends beyond the actual webinar. For example, marketers can empower their audience and allow them to dictate the topic and questions within a webinar by asking registrants to contribute questions before the event takes place.

Elle Woulfe, PathFactory’s Vice President of Marketing, uses this tactic when promoting webinars. According to Woulfe, the results are good, telling Demand Gen Report that collecting questions ahead of time helps prepare webinar panelists and encourages registrants to attend so they can see their questions answered.

Woulfe also tells Demand Gen Report that webinars can pull in even more questions and engagement when co-marketing panel webinars.

Making More With Webinar Leftovers

Finally webinars, it turns out, are content-rich opportunities. That is, they can easily be re-cut, reused and recycled into additional content. Podcasts, small videos, ebooks, YouTube videos can all be derived from a single webinar and can further engagement as time wears on.

Old webinars are actually really solid sources of engagement, too. In fact, according to the ON24 Webinar Benchmarks Report 2019, 36 percent of all webinar attendees only attend on-demand webinars. That’s a third of your overall attendees — and plenty of opportunities to drive more engagement.

For example, marketers can run old webinars as a simulive event — where a team member sits in on a replay and answers any questions that come through on chat. Marketers can also provide unique polls for attendees watching an always-on event or provide attendees with new, relevant information.

At the end of the day, B2B engagement is about knowing where audiences are most likely going to interact and reaching out to talk with them. Understanding your audience’s pain points is essential, but so is making it easy for them to share their concerns and questions with you. Find those opportunities within your webinar events and take advantage of them.

4 Marketing Mindsets That Don’t Cut It Anymore

According to content marketers, content marketing today is in bad shape. It should be no surprise as to why: more content is being created, shared and promoted than ever before, but with little to focus on what content audiences actually want.

According to a joint study between ON24 and Heinz Marketing, marketers have shown a significant decline in the confidence they have in their content marketing strategies.  The problem has gotten so bad, in fact, that most marketers don’t know if they’re delivering the right content to the right audience, don’t measure performance and don’t measure results.

More Content Marketing Tips

The uncertainty around content marketing and its performance is unfortunate, but it doesn’t have to be fatal. Marketers can pull themselves out of their rut by understanding the four marketing mindsets that don’t cut it anymore.

Bad Marketing Mindset One: Growth Hacking

Growth hacking is a popular marketing mindset that exploded in the past decade. There are many different growth hacking definitions, but, in principle, the strategy centers around “grow the company no matter what.” Often, it does so through rapid campaign iterations.

The problem with most growth hacking efforts today, however, is that it distracts from the important, foundational elements a marketing program needs. Foundational strategies are thrown out the window in favor of whatever works. Buyer personas are inaccurate, not done or are targeted as “anyone and everyone.” The buyer’s journey

Growth hacking may work for a short while and provide early-stage startups with some numbers to show investors. But these early-growth sprints deplete marketing reserves at the cost of long-term, consistent growth.

Bad Marketing Mindset Two: Guesswork

Too many marketing campaigns today operate on guesswork. Marketers will share content they perceive as relevant, or popular, for an audience without considering actual pain points, needs or objectives. The guessing problem is prevalent and stems from a variety of factors.

Instead, marketers should use what they know and build from there. The scientific method — where marketers hypothesize, experiment, measure and assess — can add certainty to any content program. For example, editorial calendars can be used to plot out iterations on popular blog posts or content. They can also be changed based off of measured results.

Bad Marketing Mindset Three: More Means Better

Adding more to the pile of blogs and white papers and e-books inundates and intimidates clients and prospects. It’s also emblematic of something worse: that you don’t actually know your audience all that well.

Take the time to understand what your customers and prospects actually care about when it comes to your content. And a better understanding includes more than just the substance of the content you’re creating. Know which formats and channels drive more interaction, engagement and interest and deliver content for those channels.

Bad Marketing Mindset Four: Follow the Leader

There are a lot of marketing success stories out there. In fact, sharing those stories is a mini-industry unto itself. It’s tempting to look at the success of others and copy what they do, but copying a tactic or strategy and applying it to your marketing situation ignores the needs of your audience.

Remember that every business, yours included, is uniquely different. Your customers, selling environment and your industry add up to one requirement: content created from your organization’s unique perspective. To create this unique perspective, you need to have a strong understanding of your audience, their pain points and where and how they engage with your content.

How ON24 Does Webinar Registration Without the Forms

This past month, we tested a new registration process for our Webinar Best Practices Series. Instead of filling out a cumbersome form, users simply click a button to add the webinar to their calendar, and voilà, they are registered. This simplified process lowers the barrier to registration and, so far, has led to an uplift in our numbers. After a few requests for an explanation of how it works we decided it was time to share it with our fellow webinerds!

How it works

The mechanics are simple. Note that, while we are using Marketo to accomplish this, it should also be possible with other automation platforms.

The first thing we did was create a simple landing page with buttons to add the webinar to the user’s calendar. We marked the page with both noidex and nofollow so search engines can’t find it. We’ll explain why soon.

ON24’s integration with Marketo means we can use any action to trigger a webinar registration flow. Generally we wait for a form-fill, but, in this case, what we’re looking for is a click on either of two particular landing page links.

The information in the calendar invites is stored as query strings at the end of the links, so make sure you strip everything after (and including) the question mark off of the end of the link.

After we set up the trigger, all we have to do is add our standard registration flow steps to the smart campaign. Once that’s done, we’re ready for the races.

Things to consider

This process does have two major limitations to consider:

  1. This only works for people who have your Marketo cookie. To combat this, we only included in email sends from Marketo and we made sure that page was not findable on Google.
  2. The process doesn’t work if people forward the email. Depending on your audience, this could be a big problem. So far, it hasn’t been for us, but we are still in the testing phase.

The Screenless Internet: Marketing In the Next Frontier

This post originally appeared on MarketingLand.com. Shared with the author’s permission.

I’ve caught myself a few times in recent weeks – sitting at my desk and flipping between looking at my computer screen and my phone in hand. Across the office, television news runs on mute. It’s hard to avoid screens in today’s age, and even harder to avoid their constant, almost gravitational pull for our attention.

On my commute home, though, I avoid screens. I throw my phone in my duffel bag and listen to podcasts and articles as a way to decompress while staying up to date on the latest news. Ironically, I recently listened to a story by New York Times writer Farhad Manjoo, titled “I Didn’t Write This Column. I Spoke It.” The column, which was originally dictated to a smartphone, details a trend that I was already taking part in but didn’t realize: we’re moving away from screens. It may still be unconscious for most of us, but it’s happening nonetheless — whether we’re asking Alexa about the weather, having Siri set us a reminder, or listening to an audiobook.

The State of Screens in Marketing

Screens are simply a part of everyday life. But I think we’ve all experienced the fatigue that comes with constantly being glued to a screen: having our eyes strained, constantly responding to the endless pings of notifications and messages, being unable to sleep at night because we’ve been on our phone. Interacting with a screen, clearly, is not always a positive digital experience. I know that’s why I relish my commutes home, with nothing but sound. And I’m not alone. Nielsen found that online radio listening has grown steadily, and that “[a]s of early 2018, 64% of Americans ages 12 and older had listened to online radio in the past month, while 57% had listened in the past week.”

When the digital revolution exploded, it revolutionized marketing. Suddenly we had unparalleled insights into our email content, whitepapers, webinars — everything. We knew how many people watched our videos and for how long. It fundamentally transformed how marketers operated in this new data-driven world. And it all unfolded on screens. For a long time, it was hard to imagine how digital marketing would ever happen off screen.

Our Screenless Future

But now we’re starting to see that the screenless internet is coming, and with it so will screenless marketing. What’s so intriguing about this, is that we’ve almost come full circle. Even though screenless marketing represents the next step in the evolution of digital marketing, ironically, it’s not really digital at all. Our screen fatigue has driven us offline: though we still want to consume content, we don’t always want to do that through our fingers on a keyboard or touchscreen.

As the screenless internet continues to grow, we marketers have to grow in parallel: audio can now be transcribed, translated, scaled and distributed largely in the same way content – from emails to whitepapers to case studies – can be. How will this reshape marketing? The implications are endless.

In a recent article, Harvard Business Review suggests that our loyalty will be less toward brands, and more toward AI assistants like Alexa, Google Home, and HomePod who we’ll converse with daily. “In fact, we predict that AI assistants will win consumers’ trust and loyalty better than any previous marketing technology. […] AI platforms will be able to predict what combination of features, price, and performance is most appealing to someone at a given moment.”

How Marketing Stands to Gain

As a result, marketers will look to optimize their position on AI platforms and partner relationships with brands. Just as marketers have jockeyed for SEO position on search engines in the past decade, marketers may look to do the same through these personal assistant devices.

It’s up to us marketers how we shape this new marketing landscape – to understand how we will effectively “screen the screenless.” But while we don’t know what shape this will take, rest assured that the same principles of good marketing will hold steady. No matter who the medium or channel, a winning marketing strategy will always prioritize the customer and their needs, deliver them valuable and personalized content and engage them with the right message at the right time. As marketers venture into this new frontier, the ones who win – as always – will be those who abide by these proven marketing truths.

How Marketers Are and Are Not Breaking Through the B2B Noise

Most of what constitutes content marketing today is noise. While papers are drafted, reports are written, social media is scheduled and ads are bought, the marketing needle sits still. That’s because noise doesn’t stand out, drive interest or engage audiences. But that doesn’t mean content marketing isn’t worth the effort.

A joint report between Heinz Marketing and ON24, “Cut Through the B2B Noise: Drive Engagement, Action, Conversion and Loyalty,” found that while content marketing today is suffering in general, there is a path to success.

Learn How Content Can Drive Engagement

The Bad News Around Content Marketing Today

The report found that most ineffectual content marketing programs aren’t organized around data, measurements and audiences. Without a proper content infrastructure in place, marketers, in the short-term, are taking a step back from where they should be.

First, the report found only one in four content marketing professionals are confident in their strategy. Up to 47 percent of respondents rate their strategy as “somewhat effective.” Another 20 percent say their strategy isn’t effective at all.

Second, marketers are having a hard time generating relevant content. The report found that more than 45 percent of respondents are somewhat or not confident at all that they’re creating relevant content. By contrast, only one in five respondents say they’re very or extremely confident they’re creating content relevant to target audiences.

Third, marketers aren’t confident in their ability to measure the impact of content. According to the report, more than 70 percent of surveyed marketers say they’re only somewhat or not at all confident in their ability to measure the impact of their content marketing efforts. Only 13 percent of respondents say they’re extremely or very confident in measuring content impact.

All this adds up to an ecosystem where marketers lack confidence in their content. According to the report, more than 65 percent of marketing professionals claim to be only somewhat confident or not confident that their content is driving desired revenue results.

What Is Working In Content Marketing

But it’s not all doom and gloom. The small percentage of B2B content marketing programs that are successful share remarkably similar patterns. These programs, according to the report, tend to prioritize engagement, personalize content and are aligned around a customer story.

The report found that, of the marketers who have high confidence in the ability of their programs, successful content is usually shared through certain formats and channels. These media clearly have a preference for two-way, interactive engagements with audiences — increasing the time spent with high-performing content.

But what makes for high-performing content? The report found that the most successful content programs focus intensely on personalizing the experiences. In fact, many of the marketers who report content marketing success say they focus more on the experience than they do for scale and efficiency — especially when it comes to high-target accounts.

Part of what makes this personalization possible, the report found, is the ability to empathize with the buyer’s story. For example, instead of sharing the company’s story, successful content marketers develop content focusing on the prospect’s story first. Doing so lengthens the buying cycle, but it builds interest and engagement in accounts that matter.

Finally, found that great content marketing programs are a team effort. Marketing, sales and customer departments tend to be heavily aligned and share a consistent story across channels. The added benefit of tightly-integrated teams, in fact, is the ability to use the same content and story from team to team, providing customers and prospects with a consistent experience.

Most content marketing efforts today are in a bad place. They’re disorganized, uncertain and need a foundational platform to build from. Over the next few weeks, ON24 will explore the basics of building a content marketing program that breaks through the B2B noise and connects with the audience. Keep an eye on this space to learn more.