Next Week On Webinar Best Practices Series: How to Drive On-Demand Results

Appointments are a pain. You gotta find a date, time and location and make your way to the appointed place at the appointed time — and pray traffic cooperates. Fortunately, today, we can make on-demand appointments, making it easier for audiences to attend.

But what if we could make an appointment or meeting take place at any time, anywhere? Well, with an on-demand webinar program, you can. On-demand webinars — or always-on webinars as we like to call them — allow attendees to consume webinar content on their own time and to whatever capacity they wish. It’s “Netflix-style” approach to webinars and we’re going to show you how you can make your own program next week on May 14 during our next Webinar Best Practice Series event.

Discover the on-demand webinar basics with these links:

Always-on webinars are a critical element in any webinar program. In fact, according to the ON24 Webinar Benchmarks Report for 2019, more than a third of all attendees did so as on-demand attendees. For demand generation marketers, that alone should be a clear signal that their always-on house needs to be in order.

But always-on webinars demand a different approach to their live counterparts. Polls need configuring, clips need to be made and the webinars themselves need to be easy to find and access. So can you manage it all?

Well, first, you should register for next Tuesday’s event, “On-Demand Strategies.” Why? Well, Mark Bornstein, Chief Webinerd at ON24, will discuss the elements of always-on — including hubs, always-on promotion and how to integrate with demand generation — at length. But in the meantime, there are three tips you should know:

Tip 1: Have a post-webinar plan in place

Every great webinar has a plan. There’s a speaker (or speakers), a promotional strategy and talking points. But the always-on aspect always seems to be forgotten. Don’t forget it. Write out your current webinar process as accurately as you can, right up to when the event goes live. Then, jot down how you’d execute a post-live event strategy — from promotion to updated polls and more.

With the basics of an always-on strategy in place, you can quickly modify and iterate on your webinar process until the on-demand aspect becomes a natural part of your webinar workflow.

Tip 2: Centralize your content

Always-on webinars should be easy to find and easy to navigate. Often, this means having an on-demand hub. Hubs bring all of your webinars into a central location and allow your audience to binge on the webinars that interest them for as long as they want.

Keep in mind that different audiences need to find content relevant to them. Sometimes, having a targeted page can help expedite their search, boost your content and make quality engagements happen faster.  ON24 Target, for example, lets you create personalized webinar hubs that are highly-relevant to an industry or, even, an account.

Tip 3: Analyze On-Demand Results Regularly

Now for the fun part: analysis. On-demand webinars can provide you with a wealth of data that can you refine your program, boost engaging content and create even more engagement opportunities. Build out some time, maybe once a month or quarter, to go through your always-on results to see where your audiences are engaging and why.

Doing so can also help you understand who’s interacting with your on-demand program — giving you the data you need to refine and re-target as needed. For example, Twilio found its on-demand webinars are a top driver for Marketing Qualified Leads, allowing them to use MQLs as a benchmark for always-on webinar effectiveness and engagement.

There’s a lot to learn about always-on webinars. Tune in next Tuesday, May 14, at 11 a.m. PDT (2 p.m. EDT) as Mark Bornstein teaches you how to build, analyze and promote an on-demand webinar program from scratch.

The Webinerd Channel: How Protolabs Does Digital Marketing with Webinars

Today’s manufacturing industry is where digital initiatives meet physical demand. New techniques, designs and processes are seemingly generated each day largely thanks to advances in networking, computation and design. But to make this happen, digital marketing needs to be a part of the process.

Few organizations know this better than Protolabs, a digital manufacturer of custom prototypes. The company’s prototypes — designed, molded and created through new manufacturing techniques — fuel the innovations the manufacturing industry sees today.

But before Protolabs can provide its rapid manufacturing to engineers, it needs to market and sell its services. And that means it needs a digital approach.

On Thursday, May 9, Protolabs’ Marketing Specialist, Tommy Rongistch, will sit down with The Webinerd Channel crew to explain how his team uses webinars to fuel its marketing needs. During this event, Tommy will explain how Protolabs:

  • Hypothesized, experimented and refined its webinar program
  • Brought marketing and sales together to create a valuable content channel
  • Uses webinars to power its account-based marketing initiatives

Protolabs’ has an extensive library of fascinating always-on webinars, including how one customer used its service to rapidly prototype and refine DUCK!, a genuine BattleBot.

If you’d like to learn how Protolabs drive manufacturing innovation, check out its webinar channel here. Tune in to The Webinerd Channel next Thursday at 11 a.m. PDT (2 p.m. EDT) to learn how digital manufacturers master digital marketing.

Build Webinars with Clients in Mind

This post was originally published on which-50.com.

Schneider Electric builds its webinars based on partners or end-users and then pulls together content accordingly, according to Chris Quinn, its VP of Marketing.

Quinn said from that stage the company may involve multiple of its own teams to bring content together.

“For example, a seminar targeting water and waste water end-user customers included three of our businesses plus a customer who talked to a case study implementation.

“The webinar enabled us to attract people from right around the country in a cost-effective way compared to an on-ground or physical event approach — and also shows respect for customer time constraints. We reached 120 customers, which was above target.”

Quinn said Schneider Electric is a broad business covering many market segments and the company’s customers know it for a particular aspect of what it does.

“So a challenge for the company is to find practical ways to help them understand the broader problem-solving capability and solutions that we can bring to help them,” he said.

Extracting Value From Customers

When designing a program that focuses on extracting more value from existing customers, Quinn said it has to start with the customer first, then the company collaborating across teams to pull together the right content and style.

“Having a customer talk to their experience is always valuable and we generally include plenty of time for Q&A.

“We have successfully applied live polling on a few occasions to drive engagement. Most of the effort is required in the planning phase and it depends on strong collaboration, including external participation,” he said.

Types Of Webinars

There are various types of webinars and all have a specific role to play.

As one example, Quinn cites the waste water webinar as one designed to engage customers and help them understand the broader role the company can play.

As another example, Quinn said, the company had recently hosted on “targeting specifiers (electrical consultants) on the topic of digitised electrical distribution — an emerging space where we have leadership credibility.

“We did two webinars in this space — one was thought leadership/vision and the other was a technical presentation that went into the practicalities of how to get involved in this emerging space.”

Schneider’s most recent webinar was on smart grid for utility customers, targeting technical people from electrical utilities all around Australia. Smart grid, according to Quinn, is also described as “pipeline acceleration”.

He said the company did this webinar based on the opportunities it observed in the past through various tactics, and found that movement in the sector is very slow.

“We pulled the report and invited customers with the help of the sales team.

“The content for this webinar was real examples directly from one of the customers and partners using the solution,” he said

The result from that was 212 people registered, and 142 people attended.

He explained, “From the sales cycle point of view, it’s hard to comment at this stage. However, the engagement level was very high. We provided five different resources (224 downloads) and three videos (64 views).” The Q&A portion yielded 25 questions or interactions.

Want to learn more about how webinars work in APAC? Check out Webinar World Sydney right here.

Binge-Worthy Webinars Are Easy to Build

This post was originally published on which-50.com.  

The widespread consensus that we are in the midst of a new golden age of television is predicated on the combination of sophisticated storytelling and distribution platforms that put the power in the hands of the audience.

Indeed, it has given rise to a new term — ‘binge-watching’ — meaning to watch a large number of television programmes, usually from a single series, in succession.

So Maryel Roman-Price, Field Marketing Manager at Magento, an Adobe company, asks: why not adapt that ideology to webinar creation?

Webinars can be powerful tools to generate demand and diversify your channel offering —particularly when combined with a story that brings value to your audience.

“It’s cheaper than physical events, it can be wide-cast or as targeted as you want it to be. But a lot of marketers do it, so you have to stand out somehow, and you don’t necessarily have to spend a lot of money or do something out of this world [to achieve that],” Roman-Price says.

The secret is in the planning, and in listening to your audience and adapting accordingly. Look at all possible data points, Roman-Price says, and if something isn’t working, don’t be afraid to change it up.

When it comes to the development of creative content, Roman-Price says your own experience is a good starting point. What works for you probably works for the majority, she says.

“Start with that, then tweak it according to your target audience’s preferences. Look at what’s working for others — you don’t really have to re-invent the wheel, just make it better and your own. Sometimes, an idea just pops out of nowhere. You just need to expose yourself out there by reading, networking, watching, and, of course by listening to your own audience — they are always more than happy to propose ideas.”

Having a level of input can also help organisations foster audience loyalty, because it shows you value your audience’s opinions and listen to what they have to say.

“Give them air time by answering their questions and being readily available should they have more questions,” Roman-Price advises. “Make it easy for them to follow your series — have a great UX [user experience] on your webinar platform, have it available on-demand, and offer resources and not just sell to them. They sign-up and watch to learn, so give them that and entertain them at the same time.”

The elements often missing from a webinar ‘series’ are consistency and a continuous narrative. It is easy to deviate as webinar ‘episodes’ evolve. That is why having a plan that plots the narrative can be so helpful — as long as you are prepared to adapt accordingly should it fail to resonate with your audience.

Above all, never underestimate the power of being fun.

“To be ‘binge-worthy’, [a webinar] has to be addictive and likable,” Roman-Price says. “If you make it fun, then it’ll be enjoyable both for your team and the people watching it.”

Maryel Roman-Price is a presenter and panelist at Webinar World in Sydney on Thursday 2 May. To learn more about Webinar World Sydney, click here 

ON24 Will Make Austin Webi-weird at SiriusDecisions Summit 2019

There’s a lot of noise out there in the B2B world — especially when digital is involved. How can you break through it? Simple: by getting serious about engagement and getting yourself to SiriusDecisions Summit 2019. That’s right, webinerds, we’re about to get webi-weird in Austin, Texas.

SiriusDecisions Summit runs from May 5-8 at the Austin Convention Center — and we’ll be there in full force to help you break through the digital noise. Here’s how:

ON24 at SiriusDecisions Summit 2019

The Booth

Have a burning webinar question? Need to cut your way through the digital noise? Join us at booth #625 to make it happen. We’ll have webiexperts on hand to answer any questions you may have and show you how your marketing program can stand out and deliver genuine engagement with prospects and clients with webinars. We’ll also have a short webinar assessment tool you can use to measure how your webinar program stacks up.

The Sessions

SiriusDecisions recently said webinars “are the highest rated human touchpoint.” As a result, webinars are the primary channel to drive prospects from lead to revenue. But how can you drive the results you want to see from your webinars?

Mark Bornstein, our Vice President of Content Marketing and Webimaster, will show you how to build engaging audience experiences putting “human marketing” at the front of your programs and campaigns. Mark will host two sessions in meeting room 13AB on Tuesday, May 7, and Wednesday, May 8, at 11:45 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on both days. During these sessions, you’ll have the opportunity to learn:

  • Which webinar formats drive engagement
  • How to use webinars at every stage of the buying cycle
  • How to turn webinar engagement into actionable data
  • How to use webinars to supercharge ABM programs

The Fun

It’s not a conference unless there’s some offsite fun. So, to provide you with that fun, we and our Account-Based Marketing Leadership Alliance friends are putting on a little speakeasy cocktail reception on May 6 from 7:30-10:30 p.m. Will there be signature cocktails? Of course. There’ll also be live music, Prohibition-era stories and much more.

Oh, and there’s one last thing we forgot to mention: swag. We’ll have some sweet, sweet swag for you to grab at booth #625, including stickers, pens and the chance to win some noise canceling headphones. But you can only get ’em if you stop by our booth!

We’re looking forward to a great SiriusDecisions Summit and can’t wait to see you there.

Give Your Webinars a Great Lead Gen Reputation

This post was originally published on which-50.com.

Webinars are given a bad reputation because if at first they don’t succeed for lead generation, marketers give up rather than trying again.

However, Sara Gonzalez, General Manager — Digital Events at Redback Connect, says if they are considered an extension to a marketing strategy and treated as more than just simple ‘add-ons’ then people might have a different approach.

Redback Connect and ON24 have worked together to write the State of Webinar Marketing 2019 report which will be released during Webinar World in May.

Gonzales says, “My gut feel was right about how people are measuring the success of their programs. Twenty-four percent of respondents are running webinars as part of their lead generation campaigns, yet only 13 percent said their webinar programs were successful.

“A huge part of this is due to the fact that the majority of respondents measure the success of their webinars by number of registrations (68 percent) and number of attendees (74 percent). There seems to be more of a focus on platform features rather than nurturing leads through the funnel and using the amazing data that is available.”

What The Market Gets Wrong

The majority of webinar users do not consider the format or style of the event, with 63 percent of people still using basic audio and slides to present, according to Gonzalez.

“No wonder average attendance rates are dropping and people aren’t seeing success.

“I think we are wasting amazing speakers, content and opportunities and need to lift our game,” she says.

Gonzalez suggests marketers should be using the platform to host panel discussions and broadcast quality events that encourage conversations rather than one-way presentations.

“The webinar market is becoming quite saturated, so I think people really need to think about how they can stand out from the crowd,” she adds.

Why Webinars Excel

Webinars need to compliment other marketing tools, according to Gonzalez. Whatever is written can be converted to digital and vice versa.

For the report the researchers asked respondents what they love about webinars, and the consistent theme is around saving time and money and increasing accessibility.

“Think about the reach — what other tool allows you to remove geographical barriers like a webinar?

“People are working differently now and think that is why webinars are excelling — they accommodate the modern marketer and, if done properly, can be the most effective lead generation tool available,” she says.

Maximising Returns

Gonzalez says the best webinars are those that are consistent.

She explains that this requires webinars to be “planned around strategic initiatives and become an extension of a content plan.”

She says, “Organisations also need to resource more effectively. We found that it takes three to four weeks on average to plan a webinar and get it to market, and that can take anywhere from two to eight people involved in the planning and delivery process – creating the marketing material, assets, campaign, delivering the event. That’s because successful webinar organisers know that they can’t plan in silos.”

Insight50 On: Simplifying International Marketing

Our upcoming Insight50 session will explore how to simplify international marketing. Sign up for the session and have your questions answered.

Your domestic campaign is flawless — it’s engaging, measurable and drives results. It’s time to broaden its reach and expand into foreign markets. But can your campaign translate and produce the same results? Marketers today don’t see success in foreign markets by simply implementing a “cut and paste” strategy.

The “clone and go” mindset isn’t living up to expectations. Pipeline is low in APAC, cultural references are missed in France and the German team just won’t buy in.

It’s time to figure out what’s going on. Tune into this month’s Insight50, taking place this tomorrow, April 25 at 3:00 p.m. BST | 4:00 p.m. CEST (10:00 a.m. EDT) as our panel of marketers discuss what’s worked for them when it comes to global campaigns and what to avoid.

Our panel includes:

  • Michael Meinhardt: CEO at Cloudwords
  • Peter Bell: Marketing Director at Marketo
  • Paula Morris: Founder at Pi Marketing

Join us for insight into:

  • The key steps to successful local translations
  • How to segment and target your database
  • How to test and adapt campaigns for new markets
  • Best practices for benchmarking regional performance
  • Tips for aligning with local teams

Register your place today and unite your international team!

Curious about how ON24 tackles its international efforts? The ON24 team shares how they make it work:

How to Understand Your Customer’s Digital Body Language

This post was originally published on which-50.com.

Digital trends are changing the way organisations market and sell. When potential customers are more likely to begin their research online, tools such as webinars offer an engaging and cost-effective way to educate people about a product or service.

They are also a great way to identify where customers are in their buying cycle and provide tailored support specific to each customer. The key, says Daniel Harrison, General Manager Customer Experience, Oracle Digital, is in bringing together marketing and sales to decipher the digital body language.

“Understanding what a prospect did at a webinar is very important to share actionable insights to your sales team,” Harrison says.

This is where what is often seen as the flaw of webinars transforms into a strength. It is not uncommon for some 40–60 per cent of registrants to not attend. Others may leave a few minutes in. The strength lies not only in the highly engaged audience who stay for the duration, but in how sales team engage with registrants after the event. Different ‘digital body language’ cues require different responses and levels of follow-up.

“A prospect who dropped off up early might respond well to an email proposing a different set of more appealing topics, while a highly engaged prospect who asked several questions shows high purchase intent — so a sales rep should follow-up quickly,” Harrison says.

In the non-digital world, the ‘one-size-fits-all’ process of gathering these insights is highly manual, open to misinterpretation and often not based on the needs of the customer. Oracle Digital has transformed this approach by developing an engagement methodology around the webinar and automating it to drive a personalised experience.

“By analysing digital body language from webinars, we aim to drive internal efficiency in making sure our sales reps are guided accordingly on the hot opportunities. By running webinars that nurture our audiences in a programmatic manner, we also looking to shorten sales cycles and improve win rates.”

For Harrison and his team, it is all about putting customers at the steering wheel.

“We see customers as the real innovators in the Experience Economy,” he says. “They force organisations to disrupt and rethink their product roadmap and go-to-market strategy.

With that in mind, Oracle Digital analyses clickstream data to shortlist webinar topics and uses the ON24 platform to ensure the audience is anything but a mere spectator.

“They can ask questions, and use live polls and surveys to provide real-time feedback. It’s particularly important for us to get the digital pulse of our customers so we can proactively connect with them at the right time in their buying cycle.”

The result is the alignment of sales and marketing that marries the quality outcomes of the former with the reach of the latter, creating a feedback loop that is better for everybody — especially the customer.

Daniel Harrison is presenting at Webinar World in Sydney on Thursday 2 May.